There will be headaches for the new manager (whoever he is).

There will be headaches for the new manager (whoever he is).

By Don Scully

I am sure that once the new manager walks through the door, he will be hit by a spiked wall of problems. Such as Kane’s future, Levy’s (not the new managers) transfer policy, and so much more… all before he even starts training the players.

Whatever do list the new manager has waiting for him,  I bet Levy will have a smile on his face as if it is an initiation test. Why wait until they fall to the floor before getting your first kick in, do it once they are in the door and locked into a contract that could feel like cat-of-nine tails being dragged over one’s back.

Levy wants his new manager, progressive, attack-minded, favouring possession-based football, and fits into the club’s plans. But here is the catch, he won’t be given efficient funds to be able to achieve anything that the other big five clubs wish to achieve (trophies and top honours). What will be in his range, Levy hopes, is either the FA Cup or League Cup.

First, let us look at Harry Kane’s future; it is up in the sky due to the clubs mad and pathetic season. It has also been a central talking point throughout the season. No trophies equals failure, and this is another season of failure for the 27-year-old. Now, pundits and fans call on him to request a move if he wants to win silverware consistently, so one of the first things the next manager has to do is sit down with Kane and have a conversation about his future. Probably saying something like this, “if you have any ambition, my boy, then why are you here? You are 27 years old, so what have you achieved in your playing days? Bugger all… that isn’t ambition, but failure.” Or maybe not, however, the new manager might not go down the reality route and just be economical with the truth, like saying what he could achieve with him [the new manager] while he is in charge… “The sky will be your oyster,” he could say, hoping he is dealing with a gullible fool.

[Levy hiding behind the door laughing his head off… thinking, “I’ve got the right manager for the job, a total deceiver.”]

Then there is the transfer policy which Levy likes to control. This season has highlighted that significant changes will need to be made despite Mourinho bringing seven new faces to the club last summer. But further changes must mean frugal changes.

The new manager will need to sell some of the current squad that will, in turn, free up space and raise the required funds to bring in new players.

Then there will be Gareth Bale; his name will crop up regarding transfer planning as he could remain at the club on loan for a second year running if the incoming boss wishes to keep him.

On top of all that, the new manager must make sure the players’ fitness levels are up to their previous heights. There have been concerns over the fitness levels of the squad, and it needs to be addressed going forward if there is to be a significant improvement.

Then there are our defensive weaknesses for all to see. That has been the case throughout the season and one of the main reasons why the team missed out on Champions League football and trophies.

When Mourinho was in charge, he constantly chopped and changed across his defence, looking for his perfect pairing. Still, he just couldn’t find an answer to solve the issue, despite his experience of building solid fortresses. Hopefully, the new manager, whoever he is, can solve the enigma and stop his team from conceding stupid goals.

Another big challenge facing the new manager would be to bring the club and fans together, but the only way to do that would be to win Trophies, and that is where Levy will come in (or not). If Levy wants to back the new manager, he needs to compete on the same level as the other big 5 do (that isn’t going to happen).

Most supporters have been angered by the poor results and style of football on offer under Mourinho and nothing to show for it.

So, whatever fool takes over, he has a job and a half on his hands; granted, the easy part will be on the field; the hard part will be dealing with Levy’s iron fist approach and money-saving policy where players are concerned.

If the new man can deal with Levy and fix the issues seen above, he could well be onto a winner, and if he is onto a winner, he will achieve something no other manager has achieved under Levy… success (ok, one League Cup back in 2008). Bless him! And if he achieves that, despite Levy being over-bearing, he should have a statue erected in his honour for endurance and guts of steel.

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